Newspaper Nuggets — Médard Tourville (1822-1872): His Disappearance from Records Explained

The name of Médard Tourville was challenging me on my Most Wanted List for way too long. Still, I knew he died between 1871—he was listed on the Canadian Census for that year—and August 1873, when his son Olivier was married. Continue reading

The Bangle Files: #31 | Life for Marie Tourville’s Children After William Bangle’s Passing

Once the main subject of our research has died—William Bangle (1765-1821) in our case—we typically tend to forget about the widow and divert our attention to the children, usually only after their marriage. I will indeed focus on Marie Tourville in my next post, but what I am most interested in here is how this family unit worked. Continue reading

Genealogy Investigations in Missouri and Illinois #3: George Weaver’s Thoughts on Florissant, the Osage Indians and the French

Paul Sableman, Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic License.

When I was in St. Louis, over three years ago, I spent two days at the Missouri History Museum Library & Research Center to work on the Tourvilles, of course, but also on the Roussel/Fasnacht couple, and the Caillou family featured on this blog.

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My 2019 French ChallengeAZ in 100 Words—or More | Z for Zachary Richard

I will end up this Challenge by introducing you to, or remind you of, a Louisiana-born singer whose Acadian ancestry crosses mine—another telling illustration of how heartlessly families were separated during the Deportation. Continue reading

My 2019 French ChallengeAZ in 100 Words—or More | Y for YouTube

The letter Y has inspired me this. It has taken me three hundred times the amount of work of all the other posts. Anyway, enjoy and have a nice trip! 🙂 Continue reading

My 2019 French ChallengeAZ in 100 Words—or More | X for Cross

The photo featured on all my posts since the beginning of this year’s French Challenge shows the Deportation Cross memorial, located at Horton Landing, 1.5 km from Grand-Pré National Historic Site. Continue reading

My 2019 French ChallengeAZ in 100 Words—or More | W for White

Reviewing records of the locality where your Acadian ancestors eventually settled remains the best way to collect any clues about them. Thus, as nearly all of my Acadian ancestors ended up in Saint-Jacques-de-l’Achigan, local church records proved very useful indeed. Continue reading

My 2019 French ChallengeAZ in 100 Words—or More | V for Vachon

Even if I’m doing genealogy since 1990, I started to search for my Acadian ancestors rather late. It might have been a blessing though since I took up research at about the same time author André-Carl Vachon published the very three books that were—and are still—so helpful for me. Continue reading

My 2019 French ChallengeAZ in 100 Words—or More | U for Unity

The Acadia World Congress or Le Congrès mondial acadien (CMA)—founded by André Boudreau in 1994—is a festival held every five years that brings Acadians of the diaspora together to celebrate their culture and history. Continue reading

My 2019 French ChallengeAZ in 100 Words—or More | T for Thériault

Honoré Thériault is the lucky guy who married Marie Fouquet in Saint-Servan in 1760. I wrote before that after having children in Pleudihen-sur-Rance, in Brittany, France, they left for Saint-Jacques-de-l’Achigan. Continue reading