My 2019 French ChallengeAZ in 100 Words—or More | S for Saint-Jacques-de-l’Achigan

Simply known today as Saint-Jacques, Saint-Jacques-de-l’Achigan was also called Saint-Jacques-de-la-Nouvelle-Acadie by the first settlers, Acadians who arrived in 1770 from Boston. The first parish register dates back to 1774. Continue reading

My 2019 French ChallengeAZ in 100 Words—or More | R for Richard

How about meeting my ancestors Jean-Baptiste Richard and Marie-Josephte Hébert? This couple was married on May 11, 1739, in Port-Royal. Continue reading

My 2019 French ChallengeAZ in 100 Words—or More | Q for Quebec

I love this Challenge for many reasons. Since while I am brainstorming for each letter of the alphabet, I dig a little deeper into my ancestors’ lives and I end up with lots of details that help me enrich my tree. Continue reading

My 2019 French ChallengeAZ in 100 Words—or More | O for Order

The Deportation Order of the Acadians was read in English on September 5, 1755, by lieutenant colonel John Winslow inside the Saint-Charles-des-Mines Church in Grand-Pré (Nova Scotia).

“Gentlemen,

“I have received from His Excellency, Governor Lawrence, the King’s Commission which I have in my hand, and by whose orders you are conveyed together, to Manifest to you His Majesty’s final resolution to the French inhabitants of this his Province of Nova Scotia, who for almost half a century have had more Indulgence Granted them than any of his Subjects in any part of his Dominions. What use you have made of them you yourself Best Know. Continue reading

My 2019 French ChallengeAZ in 100 Words—or More | N for Naval Disaster

On December 13 of each year, Acadian Remembrance Day is commemorating the Acadians who died as a result of the deportations. The choice of the month of December for that special day is no coincidence. Continue reading

My 2019 French ChallengeAZ in 100 Words—or More | M for Massachusetts

My Leblanc ancestors, namely François Leblanc and Élisabeth Dugas, were indeed in Massachusetts after their deportation and before settling in L’Assomption, in Québec. Continue reading

My 2019 French ChallengeAZ in 100 Words—or More | L for Leblanc

It’s now time for my great-grandmother Philomène Leblanc to be featured in this Challenge on my Acadian ancestors. Continue reading

My 2019 French ChallengeAZ in 100 Words—or More | J for Judith

Judith Poitevin, whose fate I wrote about in my post on the Fouquets, was born on March 14 and baptized on April 19, 1710, in Port-Royal, Acadia. She was the daughter of Étienne Poitevin dit Parisien and Anne Daigre [or Daigle]. Continue reading