The Bangle Files: #27 | Marie Tourville at Notary Joseph Turgeon

A few weeks ago, we left William Bangle traveling across the Northwest as he had agreed to work for more than two years as a voyageur. He was absent from home during the period of May 1803 to October 1805 approximately.

On November 21, 1804, Marie Hubou dite Tourville, resident of Terrebonne, met with Notary Public Joseph Turgeon. She mentioned that her husband William Bangle has left for Upper Canada about 18 months ago, where he seemed to be residing now (it seems like she was not aware that William had signed up for two years).

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Michel Tourville Welcomes Home Agathe Bertrand

Michel Tourville (1787-1860), son of Michel Tourville and Catherine Marié, just like his brother Jean-Baptiste, made frequent visits to public notaries. One of them occurred at Notary Public Toussaint Limoges’ on February 9, 1828, and caught my eye—for a good reason that is. He took care of my 4th Great Grandmother, Agathe Bertrand.

Why, I asked myself, would Michel Tourville (who is not my direct ancestor) accommodate 72-year-old Agathe? Then it all made sense. Continue reading

Jean-Baptiste Tourville: From Saint-François-de-Sales To South Hero

I cannot help it—I keep going back to the Québec Notaries Index on Ancestry. Same proved useful as I actually found some references regarding one Jean-Baptiste Tourville. The dates of the documents lead me to believe that these are concerning Jean-Baptiste Tourville, who will later be known as John Troville, in South Hero, Vermont. Before I can put my hand on these documents (I’ll have to get them at the Bibliothèque et Archives nationales du Québec in Montréal), let’s take a look at Jean-Baptiste’s life. Continue reading

ChallengeAZ 2017—A Bangle Dictionary | W for William

William Bangle was the first child of Adam and Marie to be born in America, on September 6, 1765, in Palatine, NY. He joined the King’s Royal Regiment of New York during the Revolutionary War. In 1786, at age 19, he arrived in Montreal and, at age 28, he married Marie Tourville, most probably in Terrebonne, Québec. The couple had twelve children. William’s occupations were diverse: miller, laborer, voyageur and farmer. William also owned a few lands in or near Terrebonne. His family later moved to the Berthierville and Joliette areas. William died on February 2, 1821, at age 55.

The Bangle Files


The 2017 Challenge A to Z is proposed to the French community of bloggers by Sophie Boudarel of La Gazette des ancêtres

ChallengeAZ 2017—A Bangle Dictionary | U for Unique

Since I have started the Bangle Files, many people have asked me how I am related to this family. Marie Tourville, wife of William Bangle, is my first cousin, five times removed (or to put it simply, Marie’s father, Charles Tourville, married to Marguerite Dufour, is my five times great-uncle). That’s not what I would call a close relationship; however the history of this family is so unique that I have been quickly enraptured by its exploits and adventures. No doubt, this is a project of a lifetime. I dread the day I will have exhausted all sources available.

The Bangle Files


The 2017 Challenge A to Z is proposed to the French community of bloggers by Sophie Boudarel of La Gazette des ancêtres

Michel Tourville and the War of 1812

Bataille de Châteauguay, 1813. Bibliothèque et Archives Canada | Library and Archives Canada

As you know, I am featuring on the blog some of the 14 children born to Michel Tourville and Catherine Marié, of Saint-François-de-Sales, Île Jésus (now Laval), in Québec.

Let’s now take a look at their third child, Michel Tourville, who was born and baptized on August 15, 1787, in this parish. Despite the fact that some of his siblings emigrated to the United States (Vermont, New York, and Massachusetts), Michel remained in Lower Canada (Québec) and, besides, will be one of the first members of the Hubou-Tourville family to settle in Montréal, around 1842. He passed away in the same city in 1860, three years after his wife’s death.  Continue reading

The Bangle Files: #25 | A First Land for William Bangle

After having revisited the year 1820 through John Bangle’s uncommon way of life, let’s retrace our steps to the late 1790s to explore the one of his brother, William Bangle.

As evidenced by the Catholic parish records, William Bangle and his wife, Marie Tourville, spent the first years of their marriage in Terrebonne (ca 1794-1806) (with a brief stay in Saint-Vincent-de-Paul on Isle Jésus in 1799-1800), and then moved to Mascouche until 1812. Afterward, they will settle in Berthierville and, finally, in Sainte-Élisabeth of Joliette, where William died and was buried in 1821. Other records provide more specific details about William which we will address in the next few posts.

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South Hero’s Neighbours: Tourvilles/Trovilles and Cardinals

I was validating some dates for Jean-Baptiste Tourville and Marguerite Dome—they were married on August 2, 1836, in Saint-Luc, Saint-Jean County, in Québec just before they left for South Hero, Grand Isle County, Vermont—when I came across the next marriage record which was about Toussaint Cardinal and Catherine Audette dit Lapointe.

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Augustin Hubou dit Tourville : From Which Line Are You?

Église St-François-de-Sales, Laval, Québec. Construction 1844-1851.

If your surname is Tourville and you are, just like me, from the Hubou family line, we all share a common ancestor: Augustin Hubou dit Tourville.

Augustin and Elizabeth Forget were married on October 2, 1712, in Saint-François-de-Sales, Île Jésus (Laval nowadays), in Québec. They were the overjoyed parents of 18 children. As you may know, I usually make it a rule to never discard women, but for the purposes of this post, I intentionally chose to set them aside and consider exclusively the male children. Continue reading

A Family Affair: The Three Wives of Joseph Goulet

Canadienne, Canadien. – [ca 1750]-[ca 1780] – Archives de la Ville de Montréal, Cote CA M001 BM007-2-D27-P001

I thought you would be quite impressed by what one is allowed to define as a tight-knit community.

Want to sneak in? Follow me, but try to remain on course as the road may become winding fairly quickly!

It all began with Joseph Goulet for whom commitment was not too much of a challenge as he said Yes three times rather than once.

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