ChallengeAZ 2017—A Bangle Dictionary | P for Pennsylvania

Pennsylvania has been a major gateway for German immigrants during the 18th century. Adam Bangle and his wife Marie Davis (and probably their son John as well) arrived in Philadelphia in the fall of 1764 aboard the Jennefer to start a new life. For the most part, an immigrant would be indentured upon his arrival in order to pay for the trip. We know that about ten months later, the family was settled along the Mohawk River. Interestingly enough, John Bangle, who fought in the Revolutionary War for New York, also appears on a muster roll for Pennsylvania in 1777.

The Bangle Files


The 2017 Challenge A to Z is proposed to the French community of bloggers by Sophie Boudarel of La Gazette des ancêtres

Travel 2017—Day 0 | The Aviator’s Daughter

My father was not an aviator but rather an air mechanic still I must confess that whenever I am on a flight and literally scared to death during take-off, I am without fail thinking of him and saying to myself: what a pity for an aviator’s daughter…

I rarely spent moments alone with my father. And to be honest, he was no chatterbox. But still, we were very much alike: both avid readers, curious about everything, loving history and travels. I believe he would have enjoyed my genealogy stories. There is one thing I will always regret though: not having made a trip with him once I became an adult.

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ChallengeAZ 2017—A Bangle Dictionary | O for Ontario

Before ending up in Terrebonne around 1786, and after joining the King’s Royal Regiment of New York as loyalists during the course of the Revolutionary War, in 1784, the Bangles settled in a military camp located along the Saint Lawrence River, in Charlottenburgh, Glengarry County, Ontario, which is one-hour drive from Montréal today. We have the proof that Adam (wife Marie and daughter Catherine) as well as sons William, Henry and Peter were present in this camp. We know that Peter Bangle died in Montréal in 1790 but we have no evidence up to now as to Henry’s fate.

The Bangle Files


The 2017 Challenge A to Z is proposed to the French community of bloggers by Sophie Boudarel of La Gazette des ancêtres

ChallengeAZ 2017—A Bangle Dictionary | N for Notary

Quebec’s notarial contracts—the earliest being dated 1626—help family historians to gather precious information about their ancestors. These contracts include deeds, wills, marriage contracts, donation records, inventories of a deceased’s estate, indenture records, service agreements, exchange of goods, settlements, as well as guardianship papers. Each party is provided with an original copy and an additional copy kept by the notary, called minute, is the one we may consult nowadays. Although you have to know the notary’s name to find a specific contract, life became quite easier since Ancestry put an index online—even if it’s far from being perfect.

The Bangle Files


The 2017 Challenge A to Z is proposed to the French community of bloggers by Sophie Boudarel of La Gazette des ancêtres

ChallengeAZ 2017—A Bangle Dictionary | M for Mohawk River

About a year after having crossed the pound from Germany, Adam Bangle settled on land along the Mohawk River in Montgomery County, NY. Thanks to various documents, we can pinpoint where he and his family lived. First of all, the church the family joined was in Stone Arabia which is located north of the river. Then again, Adam was listed on a tax list for the district of Canajoharie which is located south of the river. Let’s appreciate the information since this river is 149-mile-long and is the largest tributary of the Hudson River in New York State.

The Bangle Files


The 2017 Challenge A to Z is proposed to the French community of bloggers by Sophie Boudarel of La Gazette des ancêtres

ChallengeAZ 2017—A Bangle Dictionary | L for Law

For all these ancestors we have never met, we might come up with a clue or two about their traits of personality. Take John Bangle for example. Don’t you think the guy had an aversion to authority? Thanks to the laws in place and the documents left behind for future generations to enjoy, we know that John was sued by his brother-in-law for not having reimbursed him; that he didn’t care much for the Invalid Establishment’s rules in Sorel by failing to show up for the muster roll; and that he murdered a private in his later years.

The Bangle Files


The 2017 Challenge A to Z is proposed to the French community of bloggers by Sophie Boudarel of La Gazette des ancêtres

ChallengeAZ 2017—A Bangle Dictionary | K for Kew

Let’s go back to William Hogan (Mary Bangle’s husband) and the 49th Foot Regiment he was part of. Unfortunately, to learn more about William’s fate, a visit to Great Britain’s National Archives in Kew would actually be necessary. Although Library and Archives Canada has the British colonial era’s documents in its Military Heritage collection, it does not include the Regiments’ muster rolls which contain, for each year, information about where a private was stationed and where he was transferred to. By perusing earlier years, you may even find when he entered the regiment as well as where he originated from.

The Bangle Files


The 2017 Challenge A to Z is proposed to the French community of bloggers by Sophie Boudarel of La Gazette des ancêtres

ChallengeAZ 2017—A Bangle Dictionary | J for John

John Bangle was born in Germany and probably came with his parents, Adam and Marie, when they emigrated to the United States in 1764. John has participated in the Revolutionary War for New York Province and Pennsylvania. He was taken prisoner and sent to the Province of Québec and later on joined the British loyalists. Sources suggested that he went back to New York. We know for sure Bangle’s land was confiscated and all moved to Terrebonne, Québec. Our mystery man: first marriage not found, elusive children, lost will, imprisoned wife, sentence of prison for murder. This investigation is endless.

The Bangle Files


The 2017 Challenge A to Z is proposed to the French community of bloggers by Sophie Boudarel of La Gazette des ancêtres

ChallengeAZ 2017—A Bangle Dictionary | I for Illinois

What does Illinois have to do with the Bangles? Well, a lot actually. Around 1855, Elizabeth, daughter of William and granddaughter of Adam, moved to Kankakee with her husband, François-Xavier Zace, and ten of their children (only François-Xavier Jr moved to Massachusetts). If her brother Joseph Bangle, married to Theodate Yeaton, is our Joseph, he moved to Boone County before 1850. Philip (her brother Félix?) Bangle, married to Polly Loing and a neighbour to Joseph’s family, was granted his land in 1846. Boone County (north-west of Chicago) is a two-hour drive from Kankakee (south of Chicago).

The Bangle Files


The 2017 Challenge A to Z is proposed to the French community of bloggers by Sophie Boudarel of La Gazette des ancêtres

ChallengeAZ 2017—A Bangle Dictionary | H for Hogan

William Hogan was a private of the British 49th Regiment of Foot stationed in Sorel. He married Mary Bangle (daughter of John; granddaughter of Adam) in January 1810 in the same town. According to the Catholic church records, they had three children (1810; 1811; 1815). William Hogan deserted his regiment during the course of 1810. In 1811, he was sentenced to be deported to the Leeward Islands for the next seven years. Was he really the father of Pierre, the third child? Has he returned to Sorel? Or was Mary left behind with the children? Sleuthing work is needed quickly!

The Bangle Files


The 2017 Challenge A to Z is proposed to the French community of bloggers by Sophie Boudarel of La Gazette des ancêtres