French Canadians Living in Ferrisburgh, VT in 1850: #15 Abraham Sorrell

vermont 2016

Abraham Sorrell is listed in the 1850 US Census for Ferrisburgh. He is referred to as Abram Sorell on Page 198 (left-stamped), Line 23, Household 58, with the following persons listed, respectively, on lines 19 to 22:

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ChallengeAZ 2017: Who will be following me on this journey?

For the third year in a row, starting June 1, I will be participating with my French and Quebec fellow geneabloggers in the ChallengeAZ at the invitation of Sophie Boudarel from La Gazette des ancêtres.

For those of you who have been following the Bangle Family saga on my blog, don’t you feel that something is missing?

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The Bangle Files #26: William Bangle, the Voyageur

According to various baptismal records or notary acts, William identified himself either as a miller, master miller, ploughman, farmer, daily labourer or habitant (term designing someone who owned a concession in current Québec Province territory). Still, there is a further aspect of William’s occupations that I wanted to write about—for in spite of what things look like he might have got his share of thrills.

William was also a voyageur.

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Abraham Sorrell(5)—What the 1850 US Census for Ferrisburgh Doesn’t Tell

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Abraham Sorrell, who lost his life from injuries sustained in the Civil War’s Wilderness Battle in May 1864, had married three times. His Civil War pension file offers an incredible portrait of people living in Ferrisburgh in 1850 and beyond.

This very entertaining pension file is coming to an end. After having read the testimony left by his first wife, Eliza Sears, his second wife, Eliza Carpenter, his sister-in-law, Catherine Palmer, Eliza Carpenter’s sister, and his cousin, Oliver Sorrell, it’s now time to read the conclusion reached by the Pension Office.

As promised, in about two weeks, I will publish a short biography of each person concerned in the last post of this series. Enjoy!

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Michel Tourville and the War of 1812

Bataille de Châteauguay, 1813. Bibliothèque et Archives Canada | Library and Archives Canada

As you know, I am featuring on the blog some of the 14 children born to Michel Tourville and Catherine Marié, of Saint-François-de-Sales, Île Jésus (now Laval), in Québec.

Let’s now take a look at their third child, Michel Tourville, who was born and baptized on August 15, 1787, in this parish. Despite the fact that some of his siblings emigrated to the United States (Vermont, New York, and Massachusetts), Michel remained in Lower Canada (Québec) and, besides, will be one of the first members of the Hubou-Tourville family to settle in Montréal, around 1842. He passed away in the same city in 1860, three years after his wife’s death.  Continue reading

French Canadians Living in Ferrisburgh, VT in 1850: #14 Thomas Morris

vermont 2016

Thomas Morris (whose surname is Chaput dit Maurice in Québec) is listed in the 1850 US Census for Ferrisburgh. He is referred to as Thomas Morris on Page 312, Line 22, Household 286, with the following persons listed, respectively, on lines 15 to 24:

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Abraham Sorrell(4)—What the 1850 US Census for Ferrisburgh Doesn’t Tell

vermont 2016

Abraham Sorrell, who lost his life from injuries sustained in the Civil War’s Wilderness Battle in May 1864, had married three times. His Civil War pension file offers an incredible portrait of people living in Ferrisburgh in 1850 and beyond.

After having read the testimony left by his first wife, Eliza Sears, and by his second wife, Eliza Carpenter, by his sister-in-law, Catherine Palmer, Eliza Carpenter’s sister, let’s now read my favorite one, the testimony of Abraham’s cousin, Oliver Sorrell. This affidavit is so full of details. As I mentioned before, I am fascinated by this story. I feel like a census page is coming to life!

I will publish a short biography of each person concerned in the last post of this series. Enjoy!

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From the Archives: A Snapshot of Montréal’s Common Gaol in 1820

Prison commune de Montréal, Place Vauquelin, 19e siècle — Archives de Montréal, VM6,R3067-2_155E-1939-005

Life is full of surprises.

As I was doing research for the Bangle Files at the Archives nationales du Québec on Viger Street in Montréal, I unearthed a document among the criminal files shedding light on the appalling living conditions at Montréal’s Common Gaol, actually the same building where John Bangle and his wife, Marie-Louise Quevillon, were detained in September, October, November 1820 and beyond.

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The Bangle Files: #25 | A First Land for William Bangle

After having revisited the year 1820 through John Bangle’s uncommon way of life, let’s retrace our steps to the late 1790s to explore the one of his brother, William Bangle.

As evidenced by the Catholic parish records, William Bangle and his wife, Marie Tourville, spent the first years of their marriage in Terrebonne (ca 1794-1806) (with a brief stay in Saint-Vincent-de-Paul on Isle Jésus in 1799-1800), and then moved to Mascouche until 1812. Afterward, they will settle in Berthierville and, finally, in Sainte-Élisabeth of Joliette, where William died and was buried in 1821. Other records provide more specific details about William which we will address in the next few posts.

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Abraham Sorrell(3)—What the 1850 US Census for Ferrisburgh Doesn’t Tell

vermont 2016

Abraham Sorrell, who lost his life from injuries sustained in the Civil War’s Wilderness Battle in May 1864, had married three times. His Civil War pension file offers an incredible portrait of people living in Ferrisburgh in 1850 and beyond.

After having read the testimony left by his first wife, Eliza Sears, and by his second wife, Eliza Carpenter, let’s take a look at what Eliza Carpenter’s sister, Catherine Palmer, had to say about the two lovebirds.

I will publish a short biography of each person concerned in the last post of this series. Enjoy!

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