Travel 2017 | Day 7 | From Elizabeth I to Mick Jagger: A Walking Tour of Richmond

After four full days devoted to research at The National Archives in Kew, I thought I deserved a break. For the first time today, I woke up later than 5 AM (7:30 AM!), and while surfing on the Web, I read there was a walking tour of Richmond leading to 17th-century Ham House, once home to a friend of King Charles I. Deal! Continue reading

ChallengeAZ 2017—A Bangle Dictionary | U for Unique

Since I have started the Bangle Files, many people have asked me how I am related to this family. Marie Tourville, wife of William Bangle, is my first cousin, five times removed (or to put it simply, Marie’s father, Charles Tourville, married to Marguerite Dufour, is my five times great-uncle). That’s not what I would call a close relationship; however the history of this family is so unique that I have been quickly enraptured by its exploits and adventures. No doubt, this is a project of a lifetime. I dread the day I will have exhausted all sources available.

The Bangle Files


The 2017 Challenge A to Z is proposed to the French community of bloggers by Sophie Boudarel of La Gazette des ancêtres

ChallengeAZ 2017—A Bangle Dictionary | T for Terrebonne

About a 30-minute drive from Montréal today, the village of Terrebonne was the home of the Bangles. Adam Bangle and his wife Marie had bought a house in the heart of the village in the early 1790s. The families of John and Josephte Allaire, of William and Marie Tourville, and of Catherine and Jacob Smith also settled there—no surprise here as several Germans were living in the parish, as evidenced by the Catholic records. William was said to be miller in the early years. The historical site of Île-des-Moulins includes the bakery’s original building from 1803.

The Bangle Files


The 2017 Challenge A to Z is proposed to the French community of bloggers by Sophie Boudarel of La Gazette des ancêtres

ChallengeAZ 2017—A Bangle Dictionary | S for Sorel

At the turn of the 19th century, John Bangle’s family and mother, and later on, sister Catherine and Jacob Smith’s family, settled in Sorel. The Seignory of Sorel was bought by Governor Frederick Haldimand in 1781 to accommodate loyalists who came to Canada from America after the Revolutionary War in 1777. Various military regiments were stationed in Sorel. There was also an Invalid Establishment, mainly for loyalists, veterans, and their family. The town was once known as William Henry from 1787 to 1860, after His Royal Highness’ visit to the town. Afterwards, the place changed its name back to Sorel.

The Bangle Files


The 2017 Challenge A to Z is proposed to the French community of bloggers by Sophie Boudarel of La Gazette des ancêtres

Travel 2017 | Day 4 | Finding Ol’ Blue Eyes

Hide in plain sight they say. That’s just what I have been doing. It was kind of entertaining to observe that old stubborn lady from Longueuil trying to catch me.

Well, well, well… Seems like she finally laid hands on that Description Book from the Glengarry Fencibles Regiment. Ain’t that funny! She was looking for it in the Canadian Archives, but it was here in England. Even worse, it’s available for everyone to review it on the UK’s National Archives Website. Continue reading

ChallengeAZ 2017—A Bangle Dictionary | R for Religion

As you know, the Bangles joined the Dutch Reformed Church of Stone Arabia in 1765 in today’s New York State. By settling in Terrebonne, Québec, Catherine Bangle and Jacob Smith had their children baptized in the Catholic Church, but they never abandoned their faith. Neither did John and William, although their children, born to a Catholic mother, were baptized according to the Roman Catholic rites as well. The absence of a Protestant Church in Terrebonne, the social pressure, and maybe the insistence of the priest might explain why these three couples chose to have their children joined the Catholic Church.

The Bangle Files


The 2017 Challenge A to Z is proposed to the French community of bloggers by Sophie Boudarel of La Gazette des ancêtres

ChallengeAZ 2017—A Bangle Dictionary | Q for Québec

After living in New York and Ontario, the Bangles will ultimately end up in current’s Quebec territory, more precisely in Terrebonne. At that time (in 1786), the British colony was called the Province of Quebec. Then, under the Constitutional Act of 1791, the Province was divided in two provinces, namely: Lower Canada (Quebec) and Upper Canada (Ontario). Then again, under the Act of Union of 1840, the two entities were combined and became the United Province of Canada. And finally, in 1867 (the Confederation), the Province of Quebec was created, which corresponds, more or less, to today’s province (excluding Labrador).

The Bangle Files


The 2017 Challenge A to Z is proposed to the French community of bloggers by Sophie Boudarel of La Gazette des ancêtres

Travel 2017 | Day 2 | In Beautiful Kew Garden

Yes, indeed, I am in England! As of Tuesday morning, I will be at the UK National Archives in Kew to peruse various regiments’ muster rolls pertaining to soldiers stationed in William Henry (Sorel) during the first third of the 19th century. On the top of my list is, of course, the 49th Regiment of Foot, hoping to be provided with some significant events of the life of William Hogan (husband of Mary Bangle and son-in-law of John Bangle) pre- and post-Sorel.

I’m telling you, these Bangle Files are sending me on trails I never expected to set foot on! Continue reading

ChallengeAZ 2017—A Bangle Dictionary | P for Pennsylvania

Pennsylvania has been a major gateway for German immigrants during the 18th century. Adam Bangle and his wife Marie Davis (and probably their son John as well) arrived in Philadelphia in the fall of 1764 aboard the Jennefer to start a new life. For the most part, an immigrant would be indentured upon his arrival in order to pay for the trip. We know that about ten months later, the family was settled along the Mohawk River. Interestingly enough, John Bangle, who fought in the Revolutionary War for New York, also appears on a muster roll for Pennsylvania in 1777.

The Bangle Files


The 2017 Challenge A to Z is proposed to the French community of bloggers by Sophie Boudarel of La Gazette des ancêtres

ChallengeAZ 2017—A Bangle Dictionary | O for Ontario

Before ending up in Terrebonne around 1786, and after joining the King’s Royal Regiment of New York as loyalists during the course of the Revolutionary War, in 1784, the Bangles settled in a military camp located along the Saint Lawrence River, in Charlottenburgh, Glengarry County, Ontario, which is one-hour drive from Montréal today. We have the proof that Adam (wife Marie and daughter Catherine) as well as sons William, Henry and Peter were present in this camp. We know that Peter Bangle died in Montréal in 1790 but we have no evidence up to now as to Henry’s fate.

The Bangle Files


The 2017 Challenge A to Z is proposed to the French community of bloggers by Sophie Boudarel of La Gazette des ancêtres