My 2019 French ChallengeAZ in 100 Words—or More | J for Judith

Judith Poitevin, whose fate I wrote about in my post on the Fouquets, was born on March 14 and baptized on April 19, 1710, in Port-Royal, Acadia. She was the daughter of Étienne Poitevin dit Parisien and Anne Daigre [or Daigle]. Continue reading

My 2019 French ChallengeAZ in 100 Words—or More | I for Isle Saint Jean

I have always been mixed up with Isle Saint Jean. Where was it? What is it called nowadays? Well, you have to admit, with Saint John in New Brunswick, and Saint John’s in Newfoundland, no wonder I was loosing my mind. Continue reading

My 2019 French ChallengeAZ in 100 Words—or More | H for Havre Saint-Pierre

Havre Saint-Pierre is a village located on Isle Saint-Jean where Charles Fouquet and Judith Poitevin were married and settled before being deported to France. Continue reading

My 2019 French ChallengeAZ in 100 Words—or More | G for Grand-Pré

When seeking information about their Acadian ancestors, genealogists far too often deal with the permanent loss of parish registers. Yet some of them might be tempted to believe in miracles. A case in point: the parish Saint-Charles-des-Mines has been established in 1687, but when the church has been burned in 1755, do you know what happened to the registers? Continue reading

My 2019 French ChallengeAZ in 100 Words—or More | F for Fouquet

You know why I love this Challenge so much? While writing the posts, I often get curious and distracted, and surf to visit my friend Google. And sometimes—like today—luck plays a part! Continue reading

My 2019 French ChallengeAZ in 100 Words—or More | E for Exile

After the deportation, Acadians had to endure the painful experience of exile, often separated from the rest of their families, either lost at sea or brought to another location. Continue reading

My 2019 French ChallengeAZ in 100 Words—or More | D for Deportation

I have this great poster at home telling, with narrative, illustrations, maps, and tables, the history of Acadia. And, of course, a large portion of its contents is about the deportation of the Acadians. We are all for sure aware of that unfortunate historical fact, but I must admit that before I dwelled into the subject—thanks to my Acadian ancestors—, I didn’t figure out that it spread over such a long period of time, i.e. from August 5, 1755, until 1764, after the end of the Seven Years’ War. Continue reading

My 2019 French ChallengeAZ in 100 Words—or More | C for Connecticut

Once again, thanks to Quebec parish registers, I managed to get a glimpse into the story of my Acadian ancestors. The baptismal record of my 4G aunt, Marie Esther Gaudet, reveals that if she was baptized at age 9 months in L’Assomption, Quebec, on September 28, 1767, she was actually born in Conaticotte—State of Connecticut in the US. Her parents, my ancestors, were Bonaventure Gaudet and Marie Bourgeois. Continue reading

My 2019 French ChallengeAZ in 100 Words—or More | B for Brittany

Nearly 40 years ago, I visited Belle-Île-en-Mer in Brittany, France, where I remember having learned that some Acadians were deported to France and settled on this island. Continue reading